The women of London - formidable, fabulous, funny - and always inspiring.

We're a different kind of walking company - we cater specifically for groups, whether corporate, educational or social.

Here's how it works

Step One: look at our five regular walks below to see the sort of guided tours we can offer and email us here

1. Female Pioneers in the Professions - Rebels with a cause
2. The First World War - a feminist revolution?
3. Women on the Water’s Edge - Tales from the Thameside   
4. Trials, Trauma and Triumph - How Tudor Women Shaped the Modern Era
5. Writers, Renegades and Roaring Girls

Step Two: we'll get in touch to discuss your requirements - either one of our regular walks or something more bespoke

Step Three: together, we'll work out the perfect walk for your group, showcasing London's fabulous women!

Join In Her Shoes Walks as we follow in their footsteps. Wander with our qualified guides down the City’s narrow, ancient alleyways. Meet warrior Queens and suffragettes, pickpockets, harlots and bickering fishwives, trailblazing war correspondents, nurses and inventors.

Not to mention the GHOSTS…

Our Walks

Female Pioneers in the Professions - rebels with a cause​

The City of London - for many centuries, a bastion of male privilege.  But some rebellious females fought back: from the bloodlust of Boudicca to the battles of the boardroom; from the gore of the gallows to the first female judges; from fishwives to financiers, these women changed London forever. Join us down London’s dark, winding alleys to meet trailblazing journalists, saintly philanthropists, salacious sinners - and even the occasional ghost.

Trials, Trauma and Triumph - How Tudor Women Shaped the Modern Era

From the birth of the Tudor dynasty to its glorious flowering, from its indomitable Queens and ruthless rebels to the first glorious Elizabethan era, women shaped the political, religious and social fabric of England as never before. Join us on this walk from Blackfriars to the Royal Exchange to hear how the Tudor revolution is still impacting us in the 21st century.

Women on the Water’s Edge - Tales from the Thameside

For two thousand years the Thames has been the lifeblood of London.  Though seen as an exclusively male domain, a few enterprising women have broken through that barrier. They took to the river, challenging the male industries and monopolies, selling the fish, swimming in its murky waters, even building its bridges.  This is a walk along the water’s edge to hear their stories.

Writers, Renegades and Roaring Girls

Fleet Street; for five centuries the beating heart of England’s newspaper industry. Meet the pioneering females who transformed the face of journalism - and who physically stormed the last bastion of male exclusivity. Stand where the first English actresses trod the boards - and where highwaywomen, pickpockets and prostitutes took sanctuary from the law. Literary giants, palaces, prisons, monasteries - even a Broadway legend - Fleet St has it all!

The First World War - a feminist revolution?

The Great War.  For many men, it meant death and destruction. For many women - emancipation. More than a million women swarmed into the workplace, swapping millinery for munitions factories, dressmaking for tram driving. Restrictive hobble skirts gave way to comfortable uniforms - or even trousers.  When the war ended, Britain’s new, financially independent women would not go meekly back to the home. Join us on this walk to learn how women were transformed by the First World War -- and what they did next.

The City of London – for many centuries, a bastion of male privilege.  But some rebellious females fought back: from the bloodlust of Boudicca to the battles of the boardroom; from the gore of the gallows to the first female judges; from fishwives to financiers, these women changed London forever. Join us down London’s dark, winding alleys to meet trailblazing journalists, saintly philanthropists, salacious sinners – and even the occasional ghost.

The Great War.  For many men, it meant death and destruction. For many women – emancipation. More than a million women swarmed into the workplace, swapping millinery for munitions factories, dressmaking for tram driving. Restrictive hobble skirts gave way to comfortable uniforms – or even trousers.  When the war ended, Britain’s new, financially independent women would not go meekly back to the home. Join us on this walk to learn how women were transformed by the First World War – and what they did next.

For two thousand years the Thames has been the lifeblood of London.  Though seen as an exclusively male domain, a few enterprising women have broken through that barrier. They took to the river, challenging the male industries and monopolies, selling the fish, swimming in its murky waters, even building its bridges.  This is a walk along the water’s edge to hear their stories.

From the birth of the Tudor dynasty to its glorious flowering, from its indomitable Queens and ruthless rebels to the first glorious Elizabethan era, women shaped the political, religious and social fabric of England as never before. Join us on this walk from Blackfriars to the Royal Exchange to hear how the Tudor revolution is still impacting us in the 21st century.

Fleet Street; for five centuries the beating heart of England’s newspaper industry. Meet the pioneering females who transformed the face of journalism – and who physically stormed the last bastion of male exclusivity. Stand where the first English actresses trod the boards – and where highwaywomen, pickpockets and prostitutes took sanctuary from the law. Literary giants, palaces, prisons, monasteries – even a Broadway legend – Fleet St has it all!

Some of the Women You'll Meet

Mary Frith (Moll Cutpurse)

Cross-dresser, pickpocket, highwaywoman. The original ‘roaring girl” scandalised 17th century society with outrageous behaviour.

Rose Heilbron

“Celebrity” lawyer, darling of the media and first female judge to sit at the Old Bailey.


Elizabeth Garrett Anderson

Exploited a loophole (which was then quickly closed) to become the first woman to qualify as a physician and surgeon in Britain.

Agnes Beckwith

A Victorian celebrity sensation, for her record-breaking feats in the Thames, she was dubbed The Greatest Lady Swimmer in the World!

Anne Askew

The first English woman to seek a divorce. A 16th century gospeller and martyr - tortured and burned at the stake for defying the Anglican church.

Claire Hollingworth

Pioneering war correspondent. Credited with the biggest scoop of modern times - the outbreak of the Second World War.

Bespoke Events

Tailor-Made Walks

As well as our suite of guided walks, we can also create a bespoke walk based on your particular requirements.

Tell us what you want to achieve. We’ll be happy to discuss options with you to ensure we meet your specific objectives. 

Any group or individual.  You might want to bring women’s achievements to life for your staff as part of your diversity programme, or for students as part of an educational module.  You might even want to bring your Board of Directors on a bespoke walk as part of your commitment to diversity training. You might want an outing for friends and family who share an interest in specific or general areas of female endeavour.  Or just to go on a walk which is “different”.

Typically, we create bespoke walking tours which place particular emphasis on women in specific professional sectors, or particular historic or contemporary periods.  The walks are not arduous and we ensure that they are suitable for any specific mobility needs your group may have.

As long as you like. Anything from 50 minutes at lunchtime to a full two hours at any time of the day or evening.

Team-Building Experiences

If you would like us to organise an activity which challenges your guests or teams to do some of the work, then we also offer a puzzle-solving walking-tour experience!

As well as being qualified London Guides, all our guides are Associate Members of the Institute of Tourist Guiding.  The health and safety of your groups is as important to us as their enjoyment of the walks.

This puts the walkers themselves in the driving seat – a great way to bring women’s achievements to life for your staff or students.

Your guests will first be given an orientation talk. Then, armed with a series of questions and clues, they’ll venture out onto London’s streets. Their task will be to follow the clues to key locations.

They’ll be accompanied by a fully-qualified guide who will oversee the group(s), share insights and tell stories along the way. And perhaps help out if your teams need a little nudge in the right direction!

These team activities are an interactive way to engage employees or students with women’s history and deepen their appreciation of the importance of diversity. Crucially, these walks take the learning experience out of the office and into the streets. And they’re a lot of fun!

 

About Us

group photo

Sylvia

“I love the massive contrasts in London: the glittering modern skyscrapers towering over elegant Georgian houses, tiny medieval alleyways running off grand Victorian squares. It's a city full of surprises - including the often hidden contribution made by two millennia of wonderful London women. These are my London passions. I look forward to sharing them with you.”

Sylvia has held senior posts in education for more than two decades, including Director and CEO of an Education Services company.

Samantha

“I was born and raised in South East London and the highlight of my Saturdays as a child was spending hours on the Woolwich Ferry crossing and re-crossing the fascinating and ever-changing river Thames (and trying not to be caught by the ferry master!) Today I am equally enthralled by the stories and history of the great city of London and the extraordinary people who have made their mark here.”

After studying politics in the City of London, Samantha went on to have a successful career driving the commercial development of some of Britain’s best-loved media companies.

Pam

“I first came to London on a school trip from north west England when I was 14 - and fell instantly in love with it!  Since then I’ve travelled to more than 80 countries, but am always thrilled to come home to London. To the buzz, the culture, and above all, the history. Two thousand years of stories - just waiting to be told.”

Journalist, broadcaster, world traveller, Pam moved to London in the 1980s. Her special interests are Fleet St and American London. She’s a member of the Worshipful Company of Stationers and Newspaper Makers.

Anne

“I was born to the sound of tugboats’ horns and bus engines’ thrum, so it’s no wonder I’m a Thames fanatic and a London Transport obsessive. Both granddads worked on boats on the river and my mum met my dad when she was selling tickets on the trolleybus he was driving!”

After studying for a Law degree, Anne decided on a career as an English language teacher and business skills trainer. For nearly thirty years, she has been helping international lawyers and other professionals to get things done in English. She is fascinated by how, in the end, it’s all about telling a good story.

Our Blogs

“A Rattlesnake in the Chamber”

This week, activists in Plymouth are celebrating the approval of a statue of Nancy Astor, the UK’s first sitting female MP.  Here’s our take on the trailblazing Lady Astor. It…

The Mole Women of Gants Hill!

It’s recently been in the news that Crossrail is delayed again. The first underground railway to be built in London in more than thirty years might now be around 2…

Boudicca does Brexit

There’s been much talk about the Prime Minister, Theresa May, finding her inner Boudicca or this being her Boudicca moment and as I passed the famous statue on Westminster Bridge…

Celebrating Women’s London

Dig beneath the surface of our capital’s long and colourful history and you’ll find it’s teeming with wise, wacky, wonderful women. So why aren’t they more celebrated? Everywhere you look…